Export Your Existing eBay Store to Amazon

Export Your Existing eBay Store to Amazon

By Nathan Kroizer

When it comes to the sales race, the guy using the mere-exposer method will always win. This is why Coca-Cola can sell us a bottle of sugar-water with unknown ingredients and still beat any other soda company even when it fails most blind taste test. This is why Many sellers are now seeking to expand their target-audience and sales.

eBay Has a client base of 168 million buyers per month and Amazon attracts more than 85 million per month, when both are combined they have more than 250 million customers purchasing items each month.

This huge accessibility to buying customers is what makes selling on both of them simultaneously quiet an attractive proposition. In this article, we will explain how sellers can export all their products from eBay to Amazon.

To understand the process, we will first focus on the main differences and difficulties that arise from this process and by the end of this article, we will try to provide an easy solution for each problem that was mentioned.

Incompatible categories

One of the main problems is the incompatibility between Amazon and eBay categories.

While Amazon has about 48,000 categories, eBay has “only” around 18,000. So, if a seller wants to upload an eBay product to Amazon with no equivalent category, they will be forced to search for the most suitable category Amazon has to offer.

Theoretically, it sounds like an easy task, but let us imagine for a second that you have 500 items that you want to transfer, or 10,000 items, in this case even a straw can break a camel’s back when it comes in great quantities.

Because of this, many inventory-managing companies claim that it is virtually impossible to export products without customer participation to tag each and every product to the desired category.

Quote: “Amazons categories don’t match up exactly with the categories on other channels, so you’ll need to provide some information to be sure your products get listed in the correct categories…  Brian@Sellbrite”.

The second problem with Amazons categories is the “special permission required” categories. These categories are not open to each new seller, instead, you will be required to ask for permission to list items in these categories.

Barcodes and other Amazon rules

While eBay has nearly no Bar-Code requirements for their items, and in fact they allow each seller to design a product page. Amazon has a catalog page, so if the product already exists on Amazon, the seller won’t be able to redesign his product page. Because of this, Amazon has very strict rules about fitting the new product to an existing product page, and any violation of the rules can easily cause the account be suspended. So, the seller needs to be familiar with Amazon requirements.

The first and most important rule that Amazon enforces on the Bar-code front is that each item must have a unique Bar-code, two items sharing the same Bar-code will cause numerous problems and in most cases, will result in the item not being listed in Amazon.

The second rule is the rule that each item must have a Bar-code, but this rule is a lot more flexible and there are ways to work around it.

ASIN Match

The Main advantage of Amazons catalog base system is that it gives a few options that allow the sellers to exempt certain items from the need to use Bar-codes, the main one is the ASIN match system.

ASIN (Amazon Standard Identification Number) is the ID for each product on Amazon, to be more exact, it is the Catalog number for each item.

For example, a blue hat and a brown hat will have two different ASIN’s even if they are sold by the same account, but two brown hats will have a single ASIN even if they are sold by two completely different sellers.

The requirement for a Bar-code is one per ASIN, meaning that if you can find an identical item to the one you are trying to sell, you will not be required to provide a Bar-code.

But searching a perfect match for each item you are trying to list can be at times a non-feasible task.

MWS-API

Let us imagine for a moment that you are a seller with thousands of products in your eBay inventory, the mere thought of manually uploading each and every item and fitting it to Amazon is enough to make even the bravest of men to start sweating.

Because of this Amazon decided to make your life easier when it comes to managing the inventory, and they have come up with the MWS-API (marketplace web service – Application Programming Interface). this allows you to add, delete and update items in your store and get inventory reports.

These tools are available, to sellers that have signed up for the “Pro Merchant” account on Amazon (at the cost of $39 per month, but you must have this to list more than 40 items, and if you don’t have more than 40 items, you wouldn’t have been reading this article).

However, the usage of the MWS-API system requires some developer skills. Also, because the requirements differ between each category, there is no easy and intuitive way to use this API.

More information on this subject can be found here: https://developer.amazonservices.com

Synchronization

When running two stores on the same inventory, it’s very important that the stores will be fully synchronized.

For example, let say that a product was bought from eBay, and it is either the last item of this type in the inventory or it is one-of-a-kind, and the seller was unavailable at the time to manually close the listing on Amazon, and in the meantime, another customer bought the same exact item on Amazon, the seller would have to either cancel the order on Amazon and earn negative feedback. Or give some compensation to one of the buyers and lose money.

Naturally, we would like to avoid this scenario.

So, the main advantages of a syncing system are:

  • The ability to manage a high number of products simultaneously.
    • Inventory management.
    • Keeps the positive feedback and high scores.
    • Avoids getting blocked on AmazoneBay.

 

Is it possible to export an eBay store to Amazon?

The short answer is Yes, now let’s have a look at the available options.

 

  • Manually

For small stores, an easy option is to upload each product manually to Amazon. This option does not require major technical skills.

  • Inventory file loader 

Amazon allows you to manage the inventory (add, delete, update) via uploading excel files (.xlsx or .csv). It is much easier than uploading manually since the Inventory file loader allows you to upload a group of items at once. The main problem is that it’s only available if the product page already exists.

More information at https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?ie=UTF8&nodeId=3149261

  • Turbo-lister

The Turbo-Lister is an eBay tool for managing eBay inventory. Although it is an eBay tool, Amazon supports uploading files (.txt) that were created by Turbo-Lister.
Since this tool was created, it was very slow and inefficient. Customers who are still using it, often call it “Turtle Lister”. The main problem is that Amazon only supports files from the following categories: “Sports Men, Cards & Fan Shop”, “Entertainment Memorabilia”, and part of the category “Consumer Electronics”.

More information at http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/?nodeId=201285120

  • Inventory management companies

There are many Inventory management companies like “Sellbrite” and “Solid-Commerce”. These companies have inventory management as their main focus. Also, for a monthly payment + setup costs, these companies will upload your products to Amazon (and other sites, depends on price height and customer requests).
To get started, you’ll first need to import all your listings from eBay. And then, you’ll need to link every item on the listing to your product and attach the SKU (custom label) to each of them.
When all the work is complete, you will still need to categorize each of your products by selecting a category from Amazon categories. So basically, the seller still needs to do a lot of work.

  • ExportYourStore 

As of now, this company specializes only in exporting from eBay to Amazon or to Ebid. The company doesn’t require the seller involvement in the exporting process at all, from the beginning to the end. There is no need to tag products to their Amazon category. And The company has a database with a fully matched category for each eBay product. Also, the company manages an inventory of barcodes, and a one of a kind ASIN match system that can search Amazon for those hard to find perfect matches, so that the customer doesn’t need to “deal” with that at all. They also provide a full, real-time sync, so the product quantities and prices are always equal to their eBay counterparts. And there are no additional setup fees.

 

 

This is a guest post by Nathan who is an experienced eBay and Amazon seller; the lead developer in ExportYourStore that specializes in exporting eBay stores to Amazon. Nathan can be reached by email at Nathan@exportyourstore.com and through the company website http://www.exportyourstore.com. ExportYourStore offers exporting service from eBay to Amazon with one click, real-time synchronization, barcodes management, and troubleshooting to eBay and Amazon sellers.

 

 

Amazon Australia

Amazon Australia

If you are currently selling on Amazon you are probably asking yourself “why do I need a new marketplace?  My current one delivers to all countries”.

Well try to imagine Amazon as a restaurant, then opening multiple marketplaces is the equivalent of opening a chain restaurant that serves many customers around the world.  Multiple marketplaces mean that you are now exposed to a large verity of buyers in different places, and the more you are being exposed the more opportunity for sales you have.

Why Australia?

Until now, Australia was a huge untapped source of new buyers, a whole continent that did not get catered to. now, that Amazon has created a platform for them, you have a unique chance to dominate a fairly new territory that does not have many competitors.

How Do I Access Amazon Australia?

Amazon’s Australia website will be operational at www.amazon.com.au.

How Can I Sell Products on Amazon Australia?

The Amazon Marketplace provides a model where other companies can use Amazon to sell their own products and set their own pricing. They are then responsible for getting the product into the customers’ hands by controlling their own inventory and sending the orders out to customers. It’s essentially no different to how Australian retailers sell products on eBay right now.

However, unlike eBay, Amazon plans to offer a ‘fulfilment by Amazon’ (FBA) service, which will allow sellers to store and dispatch their goods via Amazon. Unfortunately, this will not be ready by launch.

The fees involved with Marketplace were also detailed, with a $49.95 (plus GST) price tag attached for retailers that wish to have their products listed on Amazon.com.au. On top of that, Amazon will look to take a referral fee: A 6-15% commission off the top of sales generated through the Marketplace, depending on what type of product you’re selling.

During the introductory event, Amazon Australia Manager Rocco Braeuniger told attendees: “We are excited to work with many thousands of Australian businesses to help them reach more than 300 million customers around the world and to grow their business.”

The power of the Marketplace is in Amazon’s name. Globally, the online e-commerce titan, commands the eyeballs of 300 million people – so you’re selling power is amplified through the platform.

If you want to get started with Amazon in Australia, then all you need to do is head to their services website, throw in a few contact details and they will contact you with information on how to begin selling on Amazon.

At present, the Marketplace is invitation-only, with those that attended the summit given priority to sell on the platform. However, it is expected the platform will soon be open for online sign-ups too. If you want to get in early, be sure to sign up.

You can register your interest to sell on the Amazon Australia website here.

Will Amazon Prime Be Available in Australia?

The short answer: Yes.

The long answer: Yes, but not immediately.

If you’re unaware, Amazon Prime is Amazon’s subscription service that gives members access to a range of benefits. Currently, we’re unaware what these benefits will look like in Australia, but based on what we see in the US, we can make a few guesses about it.

In the US, the service costs $99 a year, or $10.99 a month. Prime gives users access to free two-day shipping and free same-day delivery in eligible zip codes in the US. This subscription also includes access to Prime Now, which gives you access to two-hour delivery for certain products. The list of benefits runs deep in the US and you can take a look at the full list here.

If you think you’ve heard of Amazon Prime before, you may be thinking of their video streaming service which is also inconveniently called ‘Amazon Prime’ Video and launched in Australia last year. This service is related to Amazon Prime in the US, where you get it for free with your subscription, but in Australia, a subscription-only gives you access to Amazon Prime streams.

We will update this post when we have more information about pricing, expected the release date and any extra juicy details we can get our hands on.

I Do Not Currently sell on Amazon, Is There an Easy Way to Transfer All My Items?

This is a question that many people ask, and it is not specific to Australia or to any other marketplace. The thought of listing manually can be a strong deterrent but luckily there are a few options that might help you

  • Inventory file loader 

Amazon allows you to manage the inventory (add, delete, update) via uploading excel files (.xlsx or .csv). It is much easier than uploading manually since the Inventory file loader allows you to upload a group of items at once. The main problem is that it’s only available if the product page already exists.

More information at https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?ie=UTF8&nodeId=3149261

  • Turbo-lister

The Turbo-Lister is an eBay tool for managing eBay inventory. Although it is an eBay tool, Amazon supports uploading files (.txt) that were created by Turbo-Lister.
Since this tool was created, it was very slow and inefficient. Customers who are still using it, often call it “Turtle Lister”. The main problem is that Amazon only supports files from the following categories: “Sports Men, Cards & Fan Shop”, “Entertainment Memorabilia”, and part of the category “Consumer Electronics”.

More information at http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/?nodeId=201285120

  • Inventory management companies

There are many Inventory management companies like “Sellbrite” and “Solid-Commerce”. These companies have inventory management as their main focus. Also, for a monthly payment + setup costs, these companies will upload your products to Amazon (and other sites, depends on price height and customer requests).
To get started, you’ll first need to import all your listings from eBay. And then, you’ll need to link every item on the listing to your product and attach the SKU (custom label) to each of them.
When all the work is complete, you will still need to categorize each of your products by selecting a category from Amazon categories. So basically, the seller still needs to do a lot of work.

  • ExportYourStore 

As of now, this company specializes only in exporting from eBay to Amazon or to Ebid. The company doesn’t require the seller involvement in the exporting process at all, from the beginning to the end. There is no need to tag products to their Amazon category. And The company has a database with a fully matched category for each eBay product. Also, the company manages an inventory of barcodes, so the customer doesn’t need to “deal” with that at all. They also provide a full, real-time sync, so the product quantities and prices are always equal to their eBay counterparts. And there are no additional setup fees.

 

This is a guest post by Nathan who is an experienced eBay and Amazon seller; the lead developer in ExportYourStore that specializes in exporting eBay stores to Amazon. Nathan can be reached by email at Nathan@exportyourstore.com and through the company website http://www.exportyourstore.com. ExportYourStore offers exporting service from eBay to Amazon with one click, real-time synchronization, barcodes management, and troubleshooting to eBay and Amazon sellers

Selling on eBay VS Selling on Amazon

Selling on eBay VS Selling on Amazon

At the beginning, there was the internet, and if you were looking to buy something online you needed to know exactly where to go and have very little concern about blindly giving away personal information and free access to your bank account.

Nowadays you have huge, safe online stores that sell anything from fresh produce to ancient toys, and this opens a whole new set of opportunities for buyers and sellers alike.

There are many great online stores but today we will focus on the two most popular ones, eBay and Amazon.

 

 

eBay

“eBay is a multinational e-commerce corporation that facilitates consumer-to-consumer and business-to-consumer sales through its website. eBay was founded in 1995 and became a notable success story of the dot-com bubble. Today, eBay is a multi-billion-dollar business with operations in about 30 countries. The company manages eBay.com, an online auction and shopping website in which people and businesses buy and sell a wide variety of goods and services worldwide. The website is free to use for buyers, but sellers are charged fees for listing items after a limited number of free listings, and again when those items are sold

 

 

Amazon

“Amazon.com is an American electronic commerce and cloud computing company that was founded on July 5, 1994. The tech giant is the largest Internet retailer in the world as measured by revenue and market capitalization, the amazon.com website started as an online bookstore and later diversified to sell video downloads/streaming, MP3 downloads/streaming, audiobook downloads/streaming, software, video games, electronics, apparel, furniture, food, toys, and jewelry. The company also produces consumer electronics—Kindle e-readers, Fire tablets, Fire TV, and Echo — and is the world’s largest provider of cloud infrastructure services. Amazon also sells certain low-end products under its in-house brand AmazonBasics.

Amazon has separate retail websites for the United States, the United Kingdom and Ireland, France, Canada, Germany, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Australia, Brazil, Japan, China, India, and Mexico. In 2016, Dutch, Polish, and Turkish language versions of the German Amazon website were also launched. Amazon also offers international shipping to certain other countries for some of its products.”

Why sell on Amazon?

The Name:

If you could look inside the brain of every person on Earth, it would be rare to find someone who hasn’t heard of Amazon.

Amazon sells products in every category imaginable – their mission is to become the “Earth’s most customer-centric company where customers can find and discover anything they might want to buy online.” Amazon shows no signs of slowing down, and it doesn’t seem like American consumers want them to: their valuation has ballooned to $50 billion, and their stock price of $535 has soared.

But in some ways, they aren’t even close to the popularity of eBay.

The Catalog Pages

Amazon works with a Catalog page system (Which is different from the customized pages system that most online shops use).

What does it mean?

Well, a catalog-based system means that not each item that gets listed on Amazon gets a unique page, for example, two brown hats from different sellers will share the same item page rather than a different page for each of them.

Why is this good?

Having your item share a page with different sellers means that the buyers can compare the item they are planning to buy and decide from which seller to buy based on the price, quality etc. you won’t have to deal with losing customers just because they did not check your item first.

Another perk of the catalog-based system is that it will exempt you from the need to provide a UPC when listing an item – providing that the item already exists in the catalog.

Why is this bad?

This type of page listing is sometimes very restricting, and not all sellers like to be ‘bunched’ up to the same place and be thrown into the sale arena in order to fight for the buyer’s affection.

Another downside is painstaking process of finding the right page to match your item (Also know as ‘ASIN Matching’) when this process is multiplied by the number of items you have, it could be a nearly impossible task – unless you are using a company that offers an ASIN Match service

The Increased Sales

Amazon throws many obstacles in the way of their sellers, they limit the customizability of their pages, they restrict their categories and are not flexible at all when an item is not perfect, but they do provide a safe-feeling respectable-looking marketplace that customers like, buying in Amazon is like buying an item in a fancy shop, it may be hard to list there, but once listed, nearly guaranteed to be sold.

FBA.

Another option That Amazon offers is the option to use their exclusive ‘Filed by Amazon’ (FBA).

What does it mean?

Filed by Amazon means that Amazon will take care of your item for you, it will pick it up from you, pack it and send it to the customer, it also provides free customer service on your behalf.

Why is it bad?

The short answer is that it is expensive, sometimes so expensive that you hardly see any profit at the end of the day.

Why sell on eBay?

The Name

eBay has been running the game for years, pioneering the third-party marketplace business model early on. eBay, who hosts both live- auction and fixed-price items in 36 countries, prides itself on “enabling economic opportunity around the world.”

While it may seem that Amazon has eclipsed eBay, both platforms are successful in different ways. It’s clear that eBay is still a major player in the e-commerce world – they have 25 million sellers worldwide.

So, which marketplace is right for you? We decided to give you a quick run-down on the basic features of both online selling sites to help make the decision a bit easier.

The Option to Auction Your Items

The most popular feature on the eBay platform is the ability to auction items, this is why it is a preferred platform for collectors and hand-crafted items, where the value is based on what people are willing to pay for rather than required to pay for.

Why is this bad?

Handling items with no fixed price value can be hard and confusing at sometimes, and in many cases, they also under-sell from their desired price.

The Customized pages and easy listing

In contrasted to Amazons catalog-based system (read above) eBay gives you the option to fully customize your item pages, it gives you nearly no restriction on how to build your page it has no restrictions on the image requirements, no limit for the descriptions and in many cases, it does not require a genuine UPC.

Why is this bad?

Sellers are sometimes like children, they don’t always know what’s best for them, having some restriction can add to a page overall look and if Amazon is like selling in a fancy store, eBay is like selling in an open market.

The third parties that will list your items for you

There are many companies that can list items on eBay for you, this is an easy option when it comes to listing thousands of items at once, they usually come with custom templates and helpful services that cater to your needs.

Who has the lowest fees?

eBay has a bad reputation among e-commerce sites, earning the nickname “Feebay” from many internet bullies. However, when you compare what it would cost to sell the same item on each site, the results tell a different story.

For this experiment, we compared the free memberships of eBay and Amazon. Here’s a breakdown of the different fees that each marketplace charges:

  • Monthly fee – This is the fee each month that sellers pay to sell on the platform.
  • Listing fee – This is the fee that is charged each time you list an item. As a seller, you are charged the listing fee whether or not the item sells.
  • Final value fee – The final value fee (FVF) is the commission percentage that each marketplace keeps from your sale.
  • Closing fee – This is the fee that a platform charges once you’ve sold an item.
  • Paypal fee – Sellers who accept payment through Paypal must also pay a fee to use their service.

After running four tests, we discovered that Amazon fees were higher than eBay fees across the board. eBay charges 10% FVF, while Amazon charges 15%. Also, eBay does not charge a closing fee. Amazon charges their closing fee based on the type of item you sold. If it was a media product (books, movie, music, etc.) the closing fee is a flat rate of $1.35. If you sold a non-media product (furniture, clothing, etc.) the closing fee is a flat rate of $0.45 plus $0.05/lb.

The only fee that eBay charges that Amazon does not is the Paypal fee. This is 2.9% of the sale price plus a flat rate of $0.30.

Winner: eBay – sellers keep an average of 5.13% more of their profits than if they sold the item on Amazon.

For a more in-depth fee comparison of all our featured marketplaces, visit our marketplace fees example page.

Which site has more shoppers?

When it comes to traffic statistics, most sites don’t even come close to competing with the performance of these online selling sites. Both Amazon and eBay have bounce rates under 25%. This means that over 75% of shoppers view more than one page on the site.

What’s more, those shoppers browse these marketplaces for astounding lengths (11 minutes, 32 seconds on Amazon and 13 minutes, 10 seconds on eBay). One explanation for the high amount of time shoppers spend on eBay is that shoppers are spending time “watching” the auctions they want to win. It’s also possible that users stay on Amazon so long because their catalog of items is so immense, shoppers have many results to sift through.

Winner: Tie – both sites get insane levels of relevant and engaged traffic.

Which site offers more seller tools?

The selling tools provided by a marketplace can be a major draw for online merchants. Unfortunately, this is an area where both eBay and Amazon seem to come up a bit short. On one hand, eBay has options for shop analytics and seller success tips – but only for those willing to pay. On the other hand, social media integration, shop analytics and tips for seller success are missing altogether from Amazon’s seller toolbelt.

One reason for Amazon’s missing tools could be that the company was initially created to provide online shoppers with an easy and convenient experience. Online merchants were invited to sell on Amazon a few years later, so seller tools weren’t an aspect of Amazon’s original business model. Although Amazon does offer some pretty great services for their shoppers, they provide minimum tools to help guide their sellers.

So…which one should I use?

When selling products online, it’s nearly impossible to compare apples to apples (or, in this case, marketplaces to marketplaces). We’ve done our best to take a look at some of the major factors that online sellers seem to consider when choosing the best place to sell online. Ultimately, different marketplaces will be better fits for different people, but hopefully, this data can help you make your decision. Many online sellers choose to sell on multiple platforms, so you can pick which one is best for you when starting out and then consider selling on both once you’re established.

conclusion

selling on eBay is great, it is easy and free, selling on Amazon is Also great, it is hard work but at the end of the day, it gets the job done.

There is no easy way to choose between them, and it mostly boils down to freedom vs efficiency.

The best option is to list on them both simultaneously but the need to manage the inventory between the two stores can prove to be sometimes too much to handle (especially if you are selling one-of-a-kind items).

big companies tend to choose eBay because of the availability of the third party listers.

Is it possible to sell on both of them?

The short answer is yes, if you have an existing eBay store, you can transfer it to Amazon and sync them, there are a few options to do so with different levels of feasibility depending on your stores’ size:

Inventory file loader 

Amazon allows you to manage the inventory (add, delete, update) via uploading excel files (.xlsx or .csv). It is much easier than uploading manually since the Inventory file loader allows you to upload a group of items at once. The main problem is that it’s only available if the product page already exists.

More information at https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?ie=UTF8&nodeId=3149261

Turbo-lister

The Turbo-Lister is an eBay tool for managing eBay inventory. Although it is an eBay tool, Amazon supports uploading files (.txt) that were created by Turbo-Lister.
Since this tool was created, it was very slow and inefficient. Customers who are still using it, often call it “Turtle Lister”. The main problem is that Amazon only supports files from the following categories: “Sports Men, Cards & Fan Shop”, “Entertainment Memorabilia”, and part of the category “Consumer Electronics”.

More information at http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html/?nodeId=201285120

Inventory management companies

There are many Inventory management companies like “Sellbrite” and “Solid-Commerce”. These companies have inventory management as their main focus. Also, for a monthly payment + setup costs, these companies will upload your products to Amazon (and other sites, depends on price height and customer requests).
To get started, you’ll first need to import all your listings from eBay. And then, you’ll need to link every item on the listing to your product and attach the SKU (custom label) to each of them.
When all the work is complete, you will still need to categorize each of your products by selecting a category from Amazon categories. So basically, the seller still needs to do a lot of work.

ExportYourStore 

As of now, this company specializes only in exporting from eBay to Amazon or to Ebid. The company doesn’t require the seller involvement in the exporting process at all, from the beginning to the end. There is no need to tag products to their Amazon category. And The company has a database with a fully matched category for each eBay product. Also, the company manages an inventory of barcodes, and a one of a kind ASIN match system that can search Amazon for those hard to find perfect matches, so that the customer doesn’t need to “deal” with that at all. They also provide a full, real-time sync, so the product quantities and prices are always equal to their eBay counterparts. And there are no additional setup fees.

 

This is a guest post by Nathan who is an experienced eBay and Amazon seller; the lead developer in ExportYourStore that specializes in exporting eBay stores to Amazon. Nathan can be reached by email at Nathan@exportyourstore.com and through the company website http://www.exportyourstore.com. ExportYourStore offers exporting service from eBay to Amazon with one click, real-time synchronization, barcodes management, and troubleshooting to eBay and Amazon sellers.